Helmut Newton


born Helmut Neustädter (31 October 1920, Berlin, Germany – 23 January 2004, West Hollywood, California, USA) was a German-Australian fashion photographer noted for his nude studies of women. He died at the age of 83 on 23 January 2004 in Los Angeles in a car accident.
Born in Berlin to a German-Jewish button-factory owner and an American mother, Newton attended the Heinrich-von-Treitschke-Realgymnasium and the American School in Berlin. Interested in photography from the age of twelve when he purchased his first camera, he worked for the German photographer Yva (Else Neulander Simon) from 1936. The increasingly oppressive restrictions placed on Jews by the Nuremberg laws meant that his father lost control of the factory in which he manufactured buttons and buckles; he was briefly interned in a concentration camp. 'Kristallnacht' on 9 November 1938 compelled the family to leave Germany. Newton's parents fled to Chile. He was issued with a passport just after turning 18, and left Germany on 5 December 1938. At Trieste he boarded the 'Conte Rosso' (along with about two hundred others escaping the Nazis) intending to journey to China. After arriving in Singapore he decided to remain as a reporter for the Straits Times and worked as a portrait photographer.
Helmut Newton's grave at Städtischer Friedhof III in Berlin
Newton was interned by British authorities while in Singapore, and was sent to Australia on board the 'Queen Mary', arriving in Sydney on 27 September 1940. [1] Internees travelled to the camp of Tatura, Victoria by train under armed guard. He was released from internment in 1942, and briefly worked as a fruit-picker in northern Victoria. In April 1942, he enlisted with the Australian Army and worked as a truck driver. After the war, in 1945 he became an Australian citizen, and changed his name to Newton in 1946. In 1948 he married actress June Browne, who performed under the stage-name 'June Brunell'. She later became a successful photographer under the ironic pseudonym 'Alice Springs'